Animals

Check out some of the animals that call Rowan Wild home below! This list is just an overview and does not include all of our animals, so be sure to come visit us to see all of our animal residents!

Alligator

American Alligator

The american alligator is the largest native reptile in North America, growing up to 15 feet long and weighing up to 1,000 pounds. Rowan Wild is currently home to two american alligators: Allie and Maximus.


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Bears

American Black Bear

Black bears are North America's smallest and most widely distributed bear species. These animals are typically shy and reclusive, and very rarely are aggressive toward humans. Rowan Wild is currently home to two american black bears: Honey and Ruff. 

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Copper Kestral

American Kestrel

American kestrels are the smallest member of the falcon family that is native to the US. These birds typically weigh between 3-6 ounces, that is about the same as, or even a little lighter than, a cell phone! Rowan Wild is currently home to one american kestrel named Copper.

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Clay Red Wolf (2)

American Red Wolf

American red wolves are a critically endangered species, with less than 200 individuals left in the world. Rowan Wild is currently home to a breeding pair, Clay and Magma, that are a part of the AZA Species Survival Plan.


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Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald eagles are one of two species of eagles native to the US. These majestic birds are a conservation success story having come back from the brink of extinction in the 1970's due to habitat loss and pesticide usage. Rowan Wild is currently home to two bald eagles: Liberty and Justice.

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Barn Owl

Barn Owl

Barn owls are the most widely distributed owl in the world, and are one of the most widely distributed birds in the world. These birds of prey are known to be near silent when flying. Rowan Wild is currently home to two barn owls: Wendy and Casper.


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Black Rat Snake

Black Rat Snake

These nonvenomous constrictors are excellent pest control, preying on mice and other small rodents. While they are called black rat snakes, they can be other colors, most notably yellow. Rowan Wild is currently home to black rat snake Luna, as well as yellow rat snakes Nova and Ravioli.

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Bud

Bobcat

Despite being the most abundant wildcat in North America bobcats are rarely seen by humans due to their shy and reclusive nature. Rowan Wild is currently home to one bobcat named Bud. 


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Corn Snake (4)

Corn Snake

This nonvenomous constrictor gets its name from the scale pattern on their belly which mimics the pattern of Maize or Flint Corn. They also have a tendency to visit corn fields and corn cribs for an easy meal of mice. Rowan Wild is currently home to three corn snakes: Kernel, Abbott, and Onyx.

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donkey

Domestic Donkey

A domesticated member of the horse family, donkeys have been used as work animals for over 5000 years. Rowan Wild is currently home to one donkey named Sam. 

Goat - Balin 15

Domestic Goat

Goats were one of the first animals to be domesticated, with evidence of domestication happening between 9,000-10,000 years ago. Today there are over 300 distinct breeds of goats in the world. Rowan Wild is currently home to four goats: Jetta, Kendra, Mo, and Baylynn.

Sheep

Domestic Sheep

Many varieties of domestic sheep are bred specifically for their wool. In many of these breeds a single individual can produce between two and thirty pounds of wool a year, with each pound of wool being able to produce up to 10 miles of yarn! Rowan Wild is currently home to two sheep: Ramses and Tarzan. 

Box Turtle

Eastern Box Turtle

Eastern box turtles have a high domed carapace (top of the shell) and a hinged plastron (bottom of the shell), which allows them to retreat into their shell and close it almost completely. Rowan Wild is currently home to three box turtles: Bonnie, Clyde, and Nacho. 

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Copperhead (2)

Eastern Copperhead

Eastern copperheads are one of two species of venomous snakes found in Rowan County. Although venomous these snakes are generally not aggressive and bites are rarely fatal to healthy adults, as their venom is considered more mild than most other pit vipers. Rowan Wild is currently home to one copperhead named Lincoln. 

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Cottonmouth

Eastern Cottonmouth

Eastern cottonmouths, also commonly known as water moccasins, get their name from the  white color of the inside of their mouth. A native of eastern North Carolina, Cottonmouths are NOT found in Rowan County. Rowan Wild is currently home to one cottonmouth named Olive. 

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Hellbender

Eastern Hellbender

Hellbenders are the largest species of salamander in the US and the third largest species in the world. These animals are considered habitat specialists, and are listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN due to habitat loss. Rowan Wild is currently home to two hellbenders: Dallas and Houston.

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King Snake

Eastern Kingsnake

These nonvenomous constrictors are most well known for their ability to eat venomous snakes such as copperheads, rattlesnakes, and cottonmouths. Kingsnakes have the ability to eat venomous snakes due to their immunity to pit viper venom. Rowan Wild is currently home to one kingsnake named Cleo. 

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Polly

Eastern Screech Owl

Despite their name, Eastern Screech Owls do not actually screech, rather they make a variety of whinny and trill calls that many people think sound kind of like a horse! Rowan Wild is currently home to two eastern screech owls: Polly and Jupiter.


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Gray Fox

Gray Fox

Gray foxes are the only member of the Canine family that can climb trees. They are often mistaken for red foxes, but can be distinguished by the tip of their tail, which is black in gray foxes, and white in red foxes. Rowan Wild is currently home to two gray foxes.

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groundhog 1

Groundhog

One of the largest members of the marmot family, groundhogs typically weigh around 13 lbs. These large rodents can eat up to 1/3 of their body weight in food each day! Rowan Wild is currently home to one groundhog.

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Guinea Hog

Guinea Hog

Guinea hogs are commonly found on small farms and homesteads due to their easy going nature and the ease of caring for them. Rowan Wild is currently home to one guinea hog named Ginger.

Barred Owl (2)

Northern Barred Owl

Northern barred owls get their name from the bar like striped coloration on their chests. It is not uncommon to hear the "who-cooks-for-you? who-cooks-for-y'all?" call of a barred owl around dawn or dusk due to their crepuscular nature. Rowan Wild is currently home to one barred owl named Juno.

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Raccoon

Raccoon

Raccoons are extremely intelligent, dexterous, and adaptable, a combination that allows for them to thrive in almost any environment, even cities. Rowan Wild is currently home to four raccoons: Roxy, Memphis, Nash, and Knox.


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foxy fox 2

Red Fox

Red foxes are the largest of the true foxes and are one of the most widely distributed carnivores is the world. Red foxes and gray foxes are often confused, but can be distinguished by the coloration of the tip of their tail which is white in red foxes and black in gray foxes. Rowan Wild is currently home to one red fox named Rose.

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Red Tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed hawks get their name from the distinct reddish brown coloration of their tail. The call of the red-tailed hawk is often used in movies, games, etc. instead of the call of a bald eagles, as the red-tail hawk call is much more majestic. Rowan Wild is currently home to one red-tailed hawk named Puck.

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Timber

Timber Rattlesnake

Timber rattlesnakes are one of two species of venomous snakes found in Rowan County. While timber rattlesnakes are venomous, they tend to have a relatively mild disposition. Rowan Wild is currently home to one timber rattlesnake named Roxanne. 

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Whitetail Deer

White-tailed Deer

The smallest member of the North American deer family, white-tailed deer are named for the coloration of the underside of their tail. When spooked, white-tailed deer will lift their tail to reveal the white color. Rowan Wild is currently home to one white-tailed deer named Wyoming.

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